Festival of Creative Learning – Throwback: Student run events

The Festival of Creative Learning exists to provide staff and students within the University of Edinburgh funding and support to run events which explore new ways of learning. Looking back through previous events which have run, it is exciting to see so many events which encourage people to try new things, get out of their comfort zones and challenge the way they learn and see the world.

In this post, we are throwing back to some wonderful events organised and run by our students.

Cooking with science: 50 shades of textures

“What a week it was! Raising eyebrows by running around campus with hand blenders and random kitchen stuff. I think I made almost 10kg of ice cream in total…”

– Konstaninos Bantounos

In this blog post, PhD student Konstaninos details his event where he combined science with cooking to teach participants about food textures and explored how science can be used in the kitchen.

You can read the full blog post at the link below:

Cooking with Science (2019)

Reading the Newspaper like a Mathematician

This event run by Imogen Morris, a PGR student in the School of Informatics, taught participants to read the newspaper like a mathematician by evaluating the validity of arguments, understanding statistics and spotting fallacies.

If you would like to find out more, you can read the full blog post below:

Reading the Newspaper like a Mathematician

LLC Blethers: An evening of Academic Storytelling

LLC Blethers is a showcase event for research within the Graduate School of Literatures Languages and Cultures. In 2019 this event took place at The Counting House, which provided an informal venue to encourage staff and students to network outwith the University.

You can read the full post, and find out more about the variety of discussions and presentations at the link below:

LLC Blethers (2019)

RUN YOUR OWN POP UP EVENT

Do you have an idea for a workshop or event which explores creative learning and innovation at the University of Edinburgh? Then consider applying to run a Festival of Creative Learning Pop-up event to make your idea a reality.

Staff and students are invited to apply to run a Festival Pop-up event at any time throughout the academic year. To find out more and to apply for funding, please click the link below:

Apply to run a FCL Pop-up event.

Festival of Creative Learning – Throwback

With the curated Festival of Creative Learning week not taking place this year, we thought we’d take the opportunity this week to throwback to previous events and highlight some of the wonderful events which have run in the past.

Don’t forget that you can still apply to run a Pop-up event at any time during the academic year. There is more information on how to apply for funding at the end of this post.

Creative Learning in Anatomy (2018 and 2019)

Victoria McCulloch, a teaching fellow in Anatomy ran this event in both 2018 and 2019. This workshop used modelling as a teaching method to learn about the muscles of facial expression.

You can read the full blog posts accompanying these workshops, and see more great photo’s from the events at the links below:

Creative Learning in Anatomy 2018 | Creative Learning in Anatomy 2019

People, Soils, microbes: the Evolution of inhabited landscapes (2019)

This event was attended and reported on by John Moriarty, our 2019 FCL event reporter. In his blog post he illustrates how Festival of Creative Learning events can encourage people to get out of their ‘comfort zone’ and experience and learn new things.

You can read the full blog post at the link below:

People, Soils, Microbes 2019

Run your own pop up event

Do you have an idea for a workshop or event which explores creative learning and innovation at the University of Edinburgh? Then consider applying to run a Festival of Creative Learning Pop-up event to make your idea a reality.

Staff and students are invited to apply to run a Festival Pop-up event at any time throughout the academic year. To find out more and to apply for funding, please click the link below:

Apply to run a FCL Pop-up event.

Her East Coast Vibe: Notes on an Album Launch

Stolen Voices (Dr Rebecca Collins and Dr Johanna Linsley) invited Dr Owen G. Parry to write about their experience of the Stolen Voices Album Launch in London. The Stolen Voices Album Launch forms part of ‘The Sonic Study Series’ and is a pop-up event as part of ‘The Festival of Creative Learning 2020.

A conceptual raffle it is! Your pre-paid ticket gives you free entry into a game where no one knows the rules but everyone’s a winner, baby. The prize – a gorgeous piece of 12 inch vinyl – an album – also conceptual.

Somewhere between medieval lore and tabloid pun these women decoded monopoly and made the sun come up via non-charismatic rituals for the broken hearted. They had carefully managed a cosmic summoning: an organised act which would render a new definition for a people on the brink of an embarrassed island – a people in decay. To manifest this act they took several trips to The Edge with some funny looking sticks, but without ever letting on about their intention: to trespass The Private Area; to linger for too long in hotel lobbies with basement spas drinking her favourite alcoholic infusion – a G&T with star anise. This act of lurking combined with their mastered style of ambient attention seeking became an embodied methodology, a concept cocktail which they casually referred to as her east coast vibe – all directed through one single inconspicuous ear. “Lets take it in turns to be me”, she whispered. And they did. And stuff happened.

Okay, this is all very good, but we have some questions: Are these women listening or being listened to? Are these women summoning or being summoned?

Here’s what we found:

There are multiple women with binders – multiple binders – and they all show up all tethered together to perform a single action at the sea-edge. They are not anonymous per se. Like, you’ve seen them before on the TV, or you’ve read about them in an Agatha Christie novel. They are coastal figurinas with binders – multiple binders – that climb into the bath with you in that moment when you just close your eyes. Shut. It’s a podcast. No. it’s your tin ship freight crate cargo sail bathtub. No. It’s the log flume at Wet n’ Wild you rode as a kid. The one where the log once “de-railed” or so they all told you over and over and over as you queued for the ride.

“So, what I’m saying is… A photo souvenir is not enough to help you forget the voices in your head”. It’s a murder mystery, guys. And yes, it’s true, it’s not clear what crime has been committed, but it’s almost entirely certain that one has.

There are objects in their mission worthy of a thicker description. Long dangly ones with arms. Not terribly useful ones, and some binoculars made of jello. Their sole purpose: to divert attention away from the four-eared detective instrument with multiple arms – there in the room – poking around, lifting-up bin lids, listening to The Clean Surface Areas of artificially constructed show homes with no real plumbing intact. Google it! These women are on a blinking mission.

She takes a stethoscope. Now here’s the thing… And lifts her top up to listen to her own heartbeat.  Ears plugged, tuning in to her own inner radio, she feels the cold metallic surface against her warm rising pecho. Her arm hairs engage causing a prickly-tingle-effect. She raises an arm up with limp intention. It’s breezy. She looks out to sea.

“What we need to do, is we need to send out a signal, and if we do this we should hear something back… within two weeks, and if we don’t hear back, we are to assume that unfortunately we were not successful this time round”.

We actively listen and wait for something that can’t ever be heard to make itself heard. Something ferocious. This could be a storm in a harbour, a corporate hack, or a territorial uprising – actual bits of land in pieces – a splitting of an island in two… let one part sink and please God let the other part float off into the North Sea like a good egg.

It’s a modest thing really. Just swarms of bees making cloud shapes over The Audience Area. Like, we know that this is just the beginning of something timed, but also pushing against time. Like, it’s not like this thing is “timely” (as in of this time), or “timeless” (as in forever relevant to the past, present, or future); but rather it feels like it’s “out of time” – by which I am referring to that feeling or tendency toward exaggeration and incretion that structures every good story.

They burrow, the women, as they drum and hum, not holes but patches in The Dry Skin-Area. Bruises appear and disappear like memory flashes.  She holds her breath and they all do. It’s quite powerful really.

For more come to CCA Glasgow on 8th February 2020 6:30pm. Tickets available through the CCA Box Office:

www.cca-glasgow.com/programme/stolen-voices-album-launch

The Sonic Study Series brings artists, interdisciplinary scholars, students and any other interested individuals together to share current research on sound and listening. Sound, vocal acts and listening are of vital importance in today’s political climate when the use of language (e.g. hate speech), affect and atmosphere require urgent attention. This series aims to address issues of care, community and companionship at a time of crisis.

Further events in the series include The Sonic Study Series hosts Lisa Busby 6th February 2020. Tickets are free but places are limited: 

www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-sonic-study-series-lisa-busby-tickets-90761356661