The Legal History of Medieval Fife

Book tickets for this event here.

This event will take you back in time to Medieval Fife, where we will be visiting several locations of historical legal interest. Central to this visit to Fife will be the case of the Culdees of St Serf’s Inch, Loch Leven v. Sir Robert de Beaune (Lochore), which took place sometime between 1124 and 1130.

It was last year that the idea for this excursion came into existence. While taking the course “Lords and Vassals in Medieval Scotland,” some of the reading material involved land grants made by the Scottish King in Fife. While looking at maps and photos, one could not help but notice that Fife is quite close to Edinburgh. It was thus that the plan came into being to organize a trip to have a look at some of the locations that had been read about in manuscripts. Sadly, this planned excursion never took place due to insufficient time for the necessary organisation. Therefore, we are very happy to have the excursion take place during this year’s Festival of Creative Learning.

Fife may very well have been the first earldom to have been held feudally by the kings of Scots after the accession of David I in 1124. Anglo-French knights who followed David to Scotland settled in Fife, and Sir Robert de Beaune was probably one of these. The grants of land David made to these knights were paid for by their providing mounted and armoured service to the king. This came to be the essence of feudalism in Scotland, and the basis for Scottish land law as it developed in the subsequent centuries.

Photo of Ruined Castle

The case central to our visit – the Culdees of St Serf’s Inch, Loch Leven v.Sir Robert de Beaune (Lochore) (1124×1130) – concerns land held by monks, or “culdees” (keledei, servants of God), who had their monastery on an island in Loch Leven. Besides the island, the monks also held some land on the lochside, including Kirkness, granted to them by the Scots king and queen Macbeth and Gruoch in the mid-eleventh century. To the south of Kirnkess is Loch Ore. On the isolated mound near the loch’s north-east one can still see standing a ruinous castle (above). This was probably the caput(head place) of the knight’s fee of Lochore that King David had granted to Sir Robert de Beaune. The dispute with the culdees concerned a fourth, or a quarter, of the lands of Kirkness.  Now Sir Robert was laying claim to some of it, to the culdees’ great indignation; but we can only speculate as to why Sir Robert thought he was entitled to act in this way. Looking at the site may give us some clues.

Other interesting historical locations and artefacts that we shall be having a look at are the Cross Macduff, where something of a sanctuary was offered to killers related to the Earl of Fife, and Markinch, the ancient capital of the Earls.

Photo of Cross Macduff
Cross Macduff


‘Hand-Made Archives’ at School of Scottish Studies Archives


Monday 18 February 09:45-16:00

Our event focuses on the traditional hand-craft of making “cleekit gloves”. 

Photo of cleekit gloves

You may be asking, what on earth are cleekit gloves? That was the very question I asked when I found a collection of letters at The School of Scottish Studies Archives (SSSA), last year. 

The collection consists of 15 letters (ref. Subject box DII: Costume) and are from members of the Scottish Women’s Rural Institute (SWRI) to the editor of Scottish Home and Country Magazine. They are in response to an article, from January 1959, seeking information on this craft. 

Scottish Home and Country was the official magazine for the SWRI and as well as connecting members and events, it used to focus on crafts, patterns, recipes and local areas of Scotland. 

We were unsure as to why our archives had come to have the letters, but to my own craft-loving eyes they were a treasure indeed. 

Along with the letters was a copy of the original article which described the craft and had a call to action for more information. It appears that cleekit gloves was acraft predominately practiced by male farm workers in 19th century Scotland, made by way of a hand-made flat hook with a tiny head, which created the dense, but elastic fabric. This craft was seen as distinct from knitting or crochet. In the letters the respondents, from all over Scotland, talked of the craft being handed on by male members of the family. 

Despite a small resurgence in interest in cleeking, thanks to the response to that article, it is something that has now been relegated to the mists of crafts past. We aim to rectify that a little this Creative Learning Week!  

At the ‘Hand-Made Archives’ event I will be delivering a talk on this collection of letters; you will be able to explore the archives yourself to find evidence of craft in our sound, photographic, video and manuscript collections; and in the afternoon we will have a cleeking workshop, led by Dr Alison Mayne. You do not have to have any craft experience to take part, this is all about having a go.

Oral transmission and handing on was such an important part of passing on the cleeking tradition and by taking part in this special day at SSSA, you will be able to give this collection of paper material three dimensions and be able to engage with our archive collections in a very tangible way indeed.

Our event is free, but booking is essential. The event will be available to book through the Festival of Creative Learning Eventbrite page from Monday 21 January. This event is currently fully booked, but please add your name to the waiting list on the Eventbrite page via the waiting list button. If a place becomes available we will contact you, but this will also help us gauge interest in running the event again. 

All craft materials, refreshments and lunch will be provided. 

If you have any questions please contact, Louise Scollay on 0131 650 4163 or email lscollay@ed.ac.uk.

Louise Scollay, Archives and Library Assistant

http://celtscot.ed.ac.uk/archives

2019 Festival of Creative Learning Programme Launches Today!

Festival of Creative Learning Logo

We are delighted to announce the programme launch of the 2019 Festival of Creative Learning. This year our curated Festival week is 18th-22nd February during which we will host over 100 extraordinary creative and innovative events. Explore our programme and book onto events here.

Photo of the Festival of Creative Learning
(c) Mihaela Bodlovic

Tango or bake your way to a new understanding of mathematics! Explore the Anthropocene through a roleplaying game or by designing your very own bio-plastics! Tour Scotland’s medieval abbeys, John Hutton’s Edinburgh and experiment with fire! Come face to face with collaborative utopia in a mobile tiny hut! Mould a new face in the historic Anatomy Museum and learn how to send and receive secret messages!

Photo of the Festival of Creative Learning
(c) Mihaela Bodlovic

Some of our events are open to the public, so please help us spread the word about the Festival within and beyond the University of Edinburgh. For more information, check out our website or email us at creative.learning@ed.ac.uk. #FCL19 @FCLUoE

Photo of the Festival of Creative Learning
(c) Mihaela Bodlovic

Festival of Creative Learning 2019 Application Window Now Open!

We are delighted to announce that the application window for the Festival of Creative Learning 2019 is now open. This year’s Festival will take place from the 18th-22nd of February 2019. Send us your innovative, collaborative, mindful, fascinating, challenging, unusual, extraordinary and super creative ideas for events that celebrate news ways of learning and teaching at the University of Edinburgh. We will be accepting applications until 5pm on the 22nd of October 2018. You can find this year’s application form and guidance on our website here.

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Festival of Creative Learning 2019

Feel free to contact us with any questions by emailing creative.learning@ed.ac.uk.

We would also like to welcome and introduce our newest team member, Theodora Sakellaridou. Theodora is taking over from Lucy Ridley as our Projects & Engagement Administrator.

Theodora says:  ‘I am very excited to be welcomed into the University of Edinburgh family and particularly by the Festival of Creative Learning. The progress of this Festival has been significant over the last three years and I am sure the best is yet to come! Jennifer and I are here to support, encourage and empower all projects and ideas. We look forward to receiving your proposals.’

theo
Theodora Sakellaridou, Projects & Engagement Administrator

Finally, I also wanted to mention that we have made a slight change in the way our funding streams are organised. Festival of Creative Learning Pop-up funding can now be applied for directly via us (rather than through the IAD Action Fund Small Grant programme). Pop-ups are a great option for anyone who would love to run a Festival of Creative Learning event during the academic year outwith the Festival week in February. Application forms and guidance are now available here. If you have a larger/more complex project in mind that would require more than £500 funding (up to £3000), you can apply for the IAD Action Fund Regular Grant, which is open this year until 15th October 2018.

Go for a walk, stretch, dance, read a poem, consider a challenging problem, play a game, climb a tree, take a nap, draw up a plan and get in touch with your Festival of Creative Learning 2019 and Pop-up event ideas. We would love to help you realise your most innovative and exciting learning and teaching dreams, ideas and experiments!